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Mosquitos Aren’t Going Away — Neither Are Bug Sprays That Are Toxic to Dogs

Enter: Wondercide, a plant-based, sustainable, pesticide-free mosquito-repellent set safe to use around your pet.

by Rebecca Caplan
September 13, 2022
Dog sitting behind a basket of Wondercide products on the grass outside
Courtesy of Wondercide

Your pet wants you to read our newsletter. (Then give them a treat.)

Whether you’re a dog, a human, or simply an ethereal entity with drinkable blood, mosquitos can make your life an itchy hell. Unfortunately, climate change isn’t helping the matter with rising temperatures causing the mosquito population to explode, and, ironically, traditional pesticide use is making things even worse. As pet owners, we’ve long known the dangers of pesticides to our pets — and now it’s becoming clear that it’s not doing our planet any favors either. Summer is technically over, but it seems as if the bug bites last well into September these days.

It was from that knowledge that Wondercide, an effective, pet-safe, earth-safe, mosquito-not-so-safe pest control system was born. Started after founder Stephanie Boone’s dog got sick from veterinarian-recommended flea-and-tick medication and quarterly pest-control services, Wondercide uses a patented essential oil blend to keep pets, humans, and lawns safe from a litany of blood-sucking bugs.

Previously, we’ve covered Wondercide’s all-natural tick repellents, but now we wanted to know if their mosquito repellent system was just as effective at keeping us bug-free as the non-pet safe brands. With their mosquito repellant bundle currently on sale, and me and my dogs quickly becoming a 24-hour drive-thru Starbucks for mosquitos every time we step into the yard, I decided now was the time to give it a try.

To start, the bundle comes with two different products, one 32-ounce lawn treatment and two 4-ounce bug sprays intended for human use only.

To be clear, neither product should be used directly on your pet, but both are safe for use around your pets. I began by spraying my backyard with the lawn treatment (I allowed neither of my dogs outside while doing so and recommend you do the same). I had the treatment settle for a few hours before dusk, a.k.a. Feeding Time for those blood suckers — then, I sprayed myself with the bug spray and went out for a beer in the backyard, with my pups tagging along.

Now, picture me outside basking in my drastically less mosquito-y yard while A Whole New World from Aladdin plays in my head. Seriously, I couldn’t believe it. As much as I hate chemicals and love the earth, a part of me really thought that an all-natural pesticide was kind of a scam. But I was very wrong and very happy to be. Not only was my lawn mosquito-free, it smelled deliciously like Cedarwood (the scent I picked; it’s also available in Lemongrass, Peppermint, and Rosemary), which gave my entire backyard a very summery vibe — minus the mosquitos.

Now, here are the specs: the 32-ounce bottle of lawn spray is intended to treat up to 5000 square feet — however, my tiny Brooklyn lawn takes up only a fraction of that size, so I had plenty leftover. If you have a yard larger than 5,000 square feet, you can purchase a concentrate from Wondercide that can be combined with water in the same 32oz container.

Personally, I like that Wondercide has committed to sustainable practices by using this method to cut down on plastic use. The bug spray is another must-have for any outdoor ventures, too. I’ve started applying it before walks and found that it’s just as effective as a deet-based spray. However, don’t expect it to be as effective in non-lawn treated areas.

All in all, these products made me a believer — not only in Wondercide, but in the hope that we can make our planet a safer and more sustainable place for people and pets. Just not mosquitos.

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rebecca caplan

Rebecca Caplan

Rebecca Caplan is a writer based in Brooklyn whose work has been featured in The New Yorker, Reductress, and Vulture. She lives in Brooklyn with her perfect, toothless dog Moose.