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Your Dog Will Lap Up These Literally Meat-Flavored Bubbles

The liquid bubbles pups are obsessed with.

by Rebecca Caplan
September 12, 2022
dog biting bubbles
Courtesy of Meaty Bu

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A few weeks ago, I was perusing the dollar section of CVS when I spotted a box of those long, colorful bubble wands and was struck with the most genius idea anyone has ever had ever had ever. Bubble wand in hand, I sprinted home, eager to fulfill my lifelong (or four minute long) dream of introducing the concept of bubbles to my dogs.

At home, I pulled the wand out and all my wildest dreams came true: My dogs were obsessed. They were living their very own version of that Charlie and The Chocolate Factory scene (minus the terrifying ceiling fan waiting to shred them to bits). They chomped, barked, and swatted at the bubbles with true magic in their eyes.

Seriously, they could have played with that bubble wand for hours, but after 15 minutes I started getting nervous that ingesting so much CVS-dollar-aisle bubble water might have adverse effects on my pups. Not wanting to give up the newly discovered magic, I got to Googling and found the true bubbles of their dreams: Meaty Bubbles.

Available from an independent seller on Etsy, Meaty Bubbles are exactly what they sound like — bubbles that smell like meat. More specifically the bubbles smell like bacon. Even more specifically, they smell absolutely rank

But my dogs didn’t think so — they were obsessed all over again. One week earlier, these dogs didn’t even know bubbles existed — and now there were floating orbs that smelled like bacon?! Knowing how much my dogs love these bubbles made the smell a lot more bearable. It also helped that these bubbles really tuckered them out. Even my “you-can-stop-throwing-the-ball-when-you’re-dead” lab mix was ready for a nap after a half hour of gentle bubble blowing on my part. Not to mention, I felt a lot more comfortable knowing the bubbles they were biting into are made of a non-toxic formula suitable for ingestion. 

My only real grievance is the price — more than $20 (including shipping from the U.K.) for a container of bubbles feels borderline dystopian. I have to imagine most of that price is reflective of the non-toxic formula, which ultimately makes the price tag worth it. The biggest pro-tip I can offer is to use the bubbles outside, as that is key to making sure the smell dissipates as quickly as possible. 

And, at the end of the day, 20 bucks and a bit of a stench doesn’t compare to the job I get when I watch my dogs rediscover the possibilities of bubbles — while chomping each and every single one to their soapy death. 

* If you don’t feel like waiting for your dog bubbles to arrive from overseas, you can get a pretty convincing dupe on Amazon.

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rebecca caplan

Rebecca Caplan

Rebecca Caplan is a writer based in Brooklyn whose work has been featured in The New Yorker, Reductress, and Vulture. She lives in Brooklyn with her perfect, toothless dog Moose.